How to Keep Your Dog Away From the Vet During the Winter

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When “the weather outside is frightful,” it can be a challenge to keep your dog healthy. Freezing temps, biting wind, snow and ice engender a slew of potential health challenges for our furry best friends, despite many having a natural fur coat.

They can still get hypothermia, frostbite, burned paws and even poisoned by the changes cold weather brings. The better you’re prepared, the healthier your dog, and the less traumatic and expensive veterinarian visits you’ll have to book this winter.

Here are a few tips that will help you keep your pooches warm and healthy this winter.

Related: Here’s How to Tell If Your Dog Has a Cold — and What to Do About It

Dogs get cold too.

Generally, if you need a warm winter coat, your dog needs one too. This is especially true for small dogs and short-coated breeds (including pit bulls, greyhounds and bull dogs), but most dogs need some protection against freezing temperatures. Pay attention to wind chill rather than the general temperature. And “my dog hates clothing” is not an excuse; would you let your 5-year-old outside in a t-shirt in 30-degree weather?

Watch out for frostbite.

Cold weather can lead to dangerous conditions, including hypothermia and frostbite, especially if dogs are outside for an extended period of time. Frostbite occurs when cold temperatures damage the skin. In dogs, the places most often affected are the ears, tail, paws and nose.

If your dog gets wet in the snow, for example, he will be more vulnerable to frostbite. Use boots on the paws, and watch out for the signs of discolored skin (pale gray or blue), redness, pain and swelling.

Dog boots are more than cute.

Image Credit: Pawz

Another serious cold weather risk is chemical burns from snowmelt products after prolonged exposure. These products can irritate the paw pads and sicken your dog if he licks his paws. Dogs that swallow 4 grams of rock salt per 2.3 pounds of body weight could actually die. That translates to 2 ounces for a 4-pound dog. If you’re the one salting your sidewalk, look for pet-friendly products. Additionally, in cold weather, dogs can cut their paws on jagged ice, or get frostbite. Dog boots are the best protection. There’s a wide variety of boots for dogs, from disposable Pawz, which are the easiest to walk in, to boots for serious outdoor adventures.

Related: When Taking Your Dog for a Walk, Beware of These Hazards

Watch out for puddle drinkers.

Be aware: If you notice a strange looking green puddle, steer clear. It’s antifreeze. Antifreeze is highly toxic to dogs; even consuming a tiny amount can be deadly. If you think your dog has lapped up antifreeze, go to the emergency animal hospital immediately. Your dog can find antifreeze in storage areas, garages, driveways, and in the road. Wipe down your dog’s paws, legs, and belly when you come inside to remove potential toxins.

Keep your dog warm inside.

Give your dog a warm place to sleep that’s protected from drafts and/or off the cold floor. A warm blanket is helpful if your house is generally cold. If your home is particularly drafty, or your heat isn’t great, have your dog wear a t-shirt or sweatshirt that super comfortable while inside.

More food, please!

As a general rule, feed your dog the best quality food you can to keep them healthy year-round. Dogs tend to burn more calories in cold weather, especially after romping in the snow or sliding on ice, so consider increasing the amount you feed slightly (after you talk to your vet). Make sure there’s plenty of fresh water to keep them hydrated and combat dry skin, and wash the water bowl frequently.

Related: We Compared the Top Dog Food Delivery Companies on Ingredients, Price and What Makes Them Special

 

 

 

 

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